Clouds Over Islands

BB8DA2D1-10B8-438C-9216-615292B811C3.JPG

What really happens in this picture is this: land heats up faster than water. When the sun comes out, the land heats quickly, forming an area of low pressure directly on the island. This results in an area of higher pressure offshore.

th-7.jpeg

Since air moves from high to low pressure, the marine moisture as well as moisture from the island gets drawn into the low pressure over the island. Low pressure creates upward vertical movement, causing the warm moist air to rise, cool and condense into a cloud directly over each island.

th-10.jpeg   th-8.jpeg       th-9.jpeg

 

Rorschach Tests

Nearly a century after Hermann Rorschach invented his ink blot test, a controversial assessment that he used in psychiatric clinics. Patients gave many different interpretations of the shapes and figures in Rorschach’s blots.

3341.jpg

Now, in the journal Plos One, R. Taylor et al at the University of Oregon, claim to have an answer. They analysed ten Rorschach ink blots and found that the five black and white patterns varied in their fractal complexity. The less complex the fractals in the blots, the more images people tended to see.

1200.jpg

Rorschach’s Blot Seven is shown at the top (a). Note the tell-tale fractal signatures of irregular curves or shapes at the edges of the symmetrical image. Some people see a woman’s head with a ponytail. Below (b) the inkblot has been altered with the fractal borders removed. The ability to see hidden patterns is reduced.

2514.jpg      H. Rorschach

Fractals are patterns that repeat themselves over different size scales. The most familiar ones appear in nature, in the branching of trees, the edges of clouds, and the contours of coastlines. When the ratio of fine to coarse details is high, scientists say the image has a high fractal complexity.

“Your eyes are amazing pattern detectors, but why are they getting fooled? It’s almost as if they are getting trigger happy, seeing things that aren’t there,” Taylor told The Guardian. His work on fractals began with studies of Jackson Pollock’s spectacular drip paintings

Mirrors

Not known for her interest in science, the Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama shows such applications in her exhibition at Washington DC’s Infinity Mirrors at the Hirschhorn Museum.yk-infinityrooms-img-05.jpg

The mirrored environments are too small to take beyond the inner detail. They take the images away from the artistic and make the viewer search for technological and scientific explanations rather than any senses of feelings within the content.

yk-infinityrooms-img-06.jpg

 

yk-infinityrooms-img-04.jpg

Elphie – Hamburg

Rising more than 100 metres above Hamburg’s harbour like a great glass galleon marooned atop an old brick warehouse, the Elbphilharmonie concert hall

4000.jpg, The Swiss architects Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron have never looked so relieved.

The project began as the unlikely dream of Alexander Gérard, a private developer and former classmate of Herzog and De Meuron, who had hoped to finance the scheme with the 45 luxury flats and 250-room hotel that are also housed in the big glass mountain. He commissioned the architects to come up with a dazzling alternative to a dreary plan for a 90-metre media office tower on the site, which died away with the end of the dotcom boom. The Swiss starchitects’ thrilling images quickly caught the public imagination and the project was adopted by the city in 2003 and prioritised as a plan of national importance.

The grand hall, itself hung from the 700-tonne roof like a dangling cocoon, features 1,000 hand-blown glass lamps and 10,000 uniquely carved acoustic panels, while the facade incorporates 600 curved panes of 48mm-thick glass. It has been compared to Kaiser Wilhelm’s megalomania,

5376.jpgThe escalator is gently curved in a hump-backed profile, so you can’t see where you’re going, adding to the camp drama of it all, before you emerge at a big picture window punched into the brick wall, affording the first great view across the harbour.
Hamburg’s completed ‘Elphie’ concert hall shines triumphant

5472-1.jpgIntricacy and complexity … the white ceiling1593.jpgOur role is to connect the old city with the new city beyond,” says De Mueron, referring to the HafenCity quarter, an emerging district slated to house 12,000 people in the former docklands, in which the “Elphie”, as locals have nicknamed the concert hall, stands as a shining beacon.

5472.jpg

The Line

Megan Piper’s new London sculpture walk is called The Line and follows the Greenwich Meridian north across the Thames into the Olympic Park at Stratford. There is strong influence from the sciences.

Quantum Cloud by A Gormley is composed of a central group of 325 extended tetrahedral sections which are connected to over 3,500 of the same elements extending into space.

Antony-Gormley---Quantum-Cloud-(Credit-Luis-Veloso)-2.jpg

Evoking the quantum age, and suggesting an unstable relation between energy and mass, it questions whether the body is produced by the field or the field by the body. Visually, it was inspired by conversations between Gormley and quantum physicist Basil Hiley.

 

Richard-Wilson---A-Slice-of-Reality-(Credit-Luis-Veloso)-2.jpg

A Slice of Reality by R Wilson is taken from an old sand dredger.

 

Alex-Chinneck-----A-Bullet-from-a-Shooting-Star---Credit-Chris-Tubbs.jpg

A Bullet from a Shooting Star by A Chinneck is 30m high and made from galvanised iron.

White Rainbows

Since last week’s blog ‘Moonbow” I have found another kind of rainbow, a ‘fog-bow’,  photographed over Rannoch Moor in Scotland.

_92603062_fogmow.png
Melvin Nicholson was out on the moor, south of Glen Coe, on Sunday when an ‘unbelievably beautiful’ white rainbow appeared.
Mr Nicholson said to the BBC: ‘It is a colourless rainbow that is made up of tiny water droplets that cause fog.
‘It’s an amazing thing to witness and can generally only be seen if the sun is behind you when you are looking at it.’

_92608011_newfogbowtwo.jpg
Another fog-bow has been photographed in the Cairngorms by A Luke, near the summit of Cairn Lochan.

Moonbows

One autumn evening in Norfolk, William Cole wrote:

“The atmosphere with humid vapours flow,

And the pale moon displays her lunar bow.”

He felt it necessary to explain with a footnote: “See the Norfolk Chronicle of Nov. 17, 1799”. It was a reference that explained the unusual lunar feature.

p04cq9vp.jpg
In this more recent image, released on 18 October 2016, a moonbow is visible in the night sky above a field in the Coquet Valley in Northumberland, England (Ian Glendinning/AP)

These lunar bows occur when light reflected from the moon (rather than shining directly from the sun) is refracted through mist or rain suspended in the dimming atmosphere.
The German romantic painter Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) showed a moon bow in his Mountain Landscape that now hangs in the Folkwang Museum in Essen (Wikipedia)

p04cq9z0.jpg